#365IWD

On March 7th 2018, I attended UN Women's International Women's Day Breakfast, at Melbourne Park Function Centre. 

Like the 700 other women and men in attendance, I sat there inspired by some of stories the speakers shared and equally horrified by some of the statistics I heard for the first time. That evening, I attended another IWD event at the Queen Victoria Women's Centre where author and activist Tara Moss presented her story and another range of statistics again pointing out the incredible imbalance between men and women's rights.

I wore my purple IWD ribbon at both events and again the following day March 8th, International Women's Day. That evening, as I took my ribbon off I thought to myself 'I wish I could wear this every day.' I wished the focus and attention women's rights had during the week of IWD, was on everyone's minds all the time. 'Every day should be International Women's Day' I thought.


365 facts you need to know

  • Women and children are 14x more likely than men to die during a disaster.
  • More than 70% of women have experienced gender- based violence in some crisis settings.
  • 60% of preventable maternal maternal mortality deaths take place in settings of conflict, displacement and natural disasters.
  • All forms of violence against women increase during disasters and displacement
  • Adolescent girls in conflict zones are 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than boys and 90% more likely to be out
  • of school compared to girls in other conflict-free countries.
  • 1 IN 5 REFUGEE OR DISPLACED WOMEN ARE ESTIMATED TO HAVE EXPERIENCED SEXUAL VIOLENCE
  • MORE THAN 70% OF THE CASUALTIES OF THE 2004 ASIAN TSUNAMI WERE WOMEN
  • DURING DROUGHTS, GIRLS ARE MORE LIKELY TO MISS SCHOOL AS THEY ARE NEEDED TO COLLECT WATER
  • AND CARE FOR FAMILY MEMBERS
  • Women make up just 23.5% of national parliaments, globally
  • 63% of the world’s illiterate population are women
  • Globally, women earn on average 60-75% of men’s wages
  • Up to 80% of men in the Asia- Paci c region admit to perpetra ng physical and/or sexual violence against women and
  • girls in their life me
  • 1 in 3 women worldwide will experience violence in their life me
  • Of all Fortune 500 companies, just 26 have a female CEO. There are just 11 female CEOs on the ASX 200, and 41 of our nation's largest companies don't have a woman on their executive leadership.
  • Globally, the propor on of senior business roles held be women stands at 24%
  • Women reinvest 90% of their income back into the household
  • More than 1.3 billion women globally don’t have access to a nancial account at a formal ins tu on
  • Women spend, on average, three hours more per day than men on unpaid work in developing countries and two hours more
  • per day than men in developed countries; when all work—paid and unpaid—is considered, women work longer hours than men.
  • While women comprise roughly 47 per cent of all employees in Australia,[2] they take home on average $251.20 less than men each week (full-time adult ordinary earnings)
  • The national gender “pay gap” is 15.3 per cent and it has remained stuck between 15 per cent and 19 per cent for the past two decades.
  • Australian women account for 68% of primary carers for older people and people with disability
  • 95% of primary parental leave (outside of the public-sector) is taken by women
  • women spend almost three times as much time taking care of children each day, compared to men.
  • In 2017, Australia was ranked 35th on a global index measuring gender equality, slipping from a high point of 15th in 2006
  • Australian women are over-represented as part-time workers in low-paid industries and in insecure work and continue to be
  • underrepresented in leadership roles in the private and public sectors.
  • 35.6% of women experience physical or sexual intimate violence by partner, or non-partner, in their lifetime.
  • Every 10 minutes somewhere in the world, an adolescent girl dies as a result of violence.
  • 70% of the people in the world living in poverty are women
  • When women have more influence over economic decisions, their families allocate more income to food, health,
  • education, children’s clothing and children's nutrition
  • 90% of casualties in contemporary conflicts are civilians, the majority of whom are women and children
  • 2 in 3 women in the Pacific will experience physical and/or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner.
  • Less than 10% of negotiators at peace tables are women
  • In the Pacific, 16% of parliamentarians are women compared to the global average of 22.7%
  • Four of the five countries in the world, as of June 2016, that have no women in parliament are in The Pacific
  • 64% of the world’s illiterate adult population are women
  • More than half of women aged 18 or older have experienced sexual harassment in their lifetime
  • In 2015-2016 the average Australian woman was reaching retirement with an average of $113,660 less superannuation than the average male. [13] As a result, women are more likely to experience poverty in their retirement years and be far more reliant on the Age Pension.
  • On average, women spend 64 per cent of their working week performing unpaid care work.[11] They spend almost twice as many hours performing such work each week compared to men.
  • It is estimated that violence against women and their children cost the Australian economy $22 billion in 2015-16.
  • Australian men and women overwhelmingly believe (90 per cent) that men should be as involved in parenting as women.[19] However, while a significant number of fathers, and in particular young fathers, would like to be able to access better workplace flexibility arrangements, men are much more likely than women to have such requests denied.
  • The number of women on the Boards of ASX-listed companies grew from 8.3 per cent in 2009 to 26.2 per cent in 2017[17] due in part to a diversity policy implemented by the ASX Corporate Governance Council in 2010. Increasing the number of women in corporate leadership positions is likely to significantly increase financial returns.
  • As of 2016, over one million Australian workers are able to take leave and enjoy other protections because of domestic violence clauses in their workplace agreement or award conditions.
  • More than one in three Australian women has experienced physical or sexual violence in her lifetime and one in two experiences sexual harassment.
  • On average, Australian women have to work an extra 56 days a year to earn the same pay as men for doing the same work.
  • In 2016, just 57 percent world's working-age women are in the labor force, compared to 70 percent of working-age men.
  • Women with full-time jobs still earn only about 77 percent of their male counterparts' earnings. Talk about how much you earn, and report inequality.
  • African-American women earn 64 cents and Latina women earn 56 cents for every dollar earned by a Caucasian man.
  • 62 million girls are denied an education all over the world.
  • Every year, an estimated 15 million girls under 18 are married worldwide, with little or no say in the matter.
  • 4 out of 5 victims of human trafficking are girls.
  • According to the UN Foundation, "At least 250,000 maternal deaths and as many as 1.7 million newborn deaths would be averted if the need for both family planning and maternal and newborn health services were met."
  • On average, 30 percent of women who have been in a relationship report that they have experienced some form of physical or sexual violence by their partner.
  • Female genital mutilation (FGM) affects more than 200 million girls and women alive today in 30 countries. It is recognized internationally as a human rights violation.
  • American women serving in Iraq or Afghanistan are more likely to be raped by a comrade then killed by an enemy, and the rate of sexual harassment reports is higher than ever. In 2016, service members reported 6,172 cases of sexual assault compared to 6,082 in 2015.
  • In Saudi Arabia, women aren't allowed to drive and are discouraged from working jobs that would put them in contact with men. The unemployment rate for women is 33 percent for women, 7 percent for men.
  • At least 1000 honor killings occur in India and Pakistan each annually. Honor based crimes are distinguished by the fact that they are often carried out by a victim's family or community.
  • Women around the world aged 15-44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria.
  • Around the world, only 32 percent of all national parliamentarians are female.
  • By 2020, there will be 1.4 million open technology jobs in the U.S. and, at the current rate of students graduating with degrees in computer science, men will outnumber women 4:1.
  • One in five women on U.S. college campuses have experienced sexual assault.
  • Less than 30 percent of the world's researchers are women.
  • One in five university students experience some form of sexual harrassment while on campus and 1.6 per cent report having been sexually assaulted with almost two-thirds of harassment victims are women
  • In Australia, young girls recieved 11 per cent less pocket money than boys.
  • Less than one in 20 girls consider a career in science, technology, engineering or maths, compared to one in five boys.
  • Women in 2016 were earning less, on average, than they were 20 years ago.
  • The majority (70 per cent) of part time work is undertaken by women.
  • In recent years 60 per cent of women are graduates, yet female post-graduates earn 82 per cent of the salary of a male post-graudate.
  • Only 24 per cent of Australian board directors and 17 per cent of chief executives are women.
  • Women earn $248.20 less than men each week.
  • Women earn up to 40 per cent less than men during their 'child bearing years' (25-44), regardless of whether or not they have children.
  • Mothers who return to work after maternity leave suffer a wage penalty of seven per cent in their first year and 12 per cent in the following year.
  • The average superannuation balance for women at retirement is $138,150 for women, compared with $292,500 for men.
  • Almost two-thirds (60 per cent) of women aged between 65 and 69 have no superannuation at all.
  • It is estimated that almost 39 per cent of single women will retire in poverty.
  • 93% of film directors are men
  • 83% of lead roles go to men
  • In the media worldwide, fewer than 1 of every 4 people that we hear from is female. In Australia: media sources - 79% are men. Opinion editorials - 72% are men.
  • Media worldwide: quotes from experts - 76% are men. The only time women have majority in the media are when they've been the victims in the news story. Quotes from victims - 79% are women.
  • In award winning children's books there's nearly twice as many main male characters as there are female.
  • In Australia, 1 woman each week dies at the hand of a former or current partner.
  • Women are 27 times more likely to be abused online than men are. The majority of abuse is misogyny, rape and death threats.
  • San Diego’s Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film conducts an annual investigation into gender in Hollywood films, and its newly-released 2017 results show that women made up only 24 percent of protagonists in last year’s top-grossing films—that’s five percent fewer than in 2016. The study also measures how many films feature 10 or more female characters with speaking roles, and that was just 32 percent in 2017, compared to 79 percent of films that featured 10 or more male characters with speaking roles. The overall number of female characters in top-grossing movies stayed static year-over-year; it was 37 percent in both 2016 and 2017.
  • Women and children are 14x more likely than men to die during a disaster.
  • There are 66 million people in crisis across the world. The highest since WW2. An average of 90% of the deaths during natural disasters are women and children.
  • The average pay gap globally is 23%.
  • One in four Australian women has experienced emotional abuse by a current or former partner.
  • Eight out of ten women aged 18 to 24 were harassed on the street in the past year.
  • 1 in 3 women experience gender based violence.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women experience violence at higher rates than non-Indigenous women.
  • One in five Australian women has experienced sexual violence.
  • In 2015 there were only 21 female heads of state in the entire world
  • Over 150 countries have at least one actively sexist law. From “legitimate” rape in India to unfair inheritance laws in the UK, the majority of countries still harbour laws that make life more difficult – or more dangerous – for women and girls. Many of these laws reinforce the notion that a woman exists as the property of a man.
  • On average, one woman a week is murdered by her current or former partner, according to the most recent analysis of homicide statistics in Australia.
  • Domestic or family violence against women results in a police call-out on average once every two minutes across across Australia.
  • Each minute, 28 girls are married before they are ready
  • Women are at least three times more likely than men to experience violence from an intimate partner.
  • In most countries, women only earn between 60 and 75% of men’s wages - for the same work
  • Around the world, 63 million girls are currently out of school
  • Women are five times more likely than men to require medical attention or hospitalisation as a result of intimate partner violence, and five times more likely to report fearing for their lives.
  • Of women who experience violence at the hands of an intimate partner, more than half have children in their care.
  • Women spend up to 5 more hours on unpaid domestic work than men each day
  • One in four Australian women has experienced physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner.
  • As with all humanitarian emergencies, women and girls are among the most vulnerable. Women and girls face a significantly increased risk for unwanted pregnancy, gender-based violence, STIs and maternal mortality [20]. 430,000 Syrian women, including refugees and those still in Syria, are pregnant and in need of maternal care
  • Domestic or family violence against women is the single largest driver of homelessness for women.
  • Violence against women is not limited to the home or intimate relationships. Every year in Australia, over 300,000 women experience violence – often sexual violence – from someone other than a partner.
  • One in four girls around the world was married before her 18th birthday
  • Young women (18 – 24 years) experience significantly higher rates of physical and sexual violence than women in older age groups.
  • Women earn the majority of bachelor’s degrees, but only a fraction of computer science degrees
  • Every day, 800 women die from preventable complications during pregnancy or childbirth
  • One in three Australian women has experienced physical violence, since the age of 15.
  • 200 million fewer women than men have access to the Internet worldwide
  • There is growing evidence that women with disabilities are more likely to experience violence.
  • Violence against women is a fundamental violation of human rights, and one that Australia has an obligation to prevent under international law.
  • Women in most countries face legal barriers that restrict their economic opportunity
  • Intimate partner violence contributes to more death, disability and illness in women aged 15 to 44 than any other preventable risk factor.
  • The U.S. is one of nine countries worldwide that doesn’t provide for paid maternity leave
  • The combined health, administration and social welfare costs of violence against women have been estimated to be $21.7 billion a year, with projections suggesting that if no further action is taken to prevent violence against women, costs will accumulate to $323.4 billion over a thirty year period from 2014-15 to 2044-45.
  • In 2015, only ½ of the world’s working-age women were in the labor force, compared to 77% working-age men.
  • African-American women (in America) earn 64 cents and Latina women earn 56 cents for every dollar earned by a Caucasianman.
  • Children and young people are hugely affected by violence against women. Exposure to violence against their mothers or other caregivers causes profound harm to children, with potential impacts on attitudes to relationships and violence, as well as behavioural, cognitive and emotional functioning, social development, and – through a process of ‘negative chain effects’ – education and later employment prospects.
  • 8 out of 10 victims of human trafficking are girls.
  • Women with full-time jobs still earn only about 77% of their male counterparts’ earnings.
  • On average, 30% of women who have been in a relationship report that they have experienced some form of intimate physical or sexual violence.
  • Every year, an estimate of 15 million girls less than 18 years are married off worldwide, with little or no say in the matter.
  • In Saudi Arabia, the unemployment rate for women is 34 percent for women, 7 percent for men.
  • 62 million girls are denied an education all over the world.
  • Only 30% of the world’s researchers are women.
  • Female genital mutilation (FGM) affects more than 200 million girls and women alive today in Africa, Asia and the Middle East where the vice is concentrated.
  • According to a report from the National Women’s Law Center, “The average full-time working woman will lose more than $460,000 over a 40-year period in wages due only to the wage gap. To catch up she will need to work 12 additional years.
  • Women around the world aged 15-44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria.
  • There are approximately 781 million illiterates in the world. Two thirds whom are women.
  • A report by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey indicated that “Women are less likely to receive the first critical promotion to manager—so far fewer end up on the path to leadership—and they are less likely to be hired into more senior positions… Corporate America promotes men at 30 percent higher rates than women during early career stages
  • 60% of the world's chronically hungry are women and girls.
  • Only 46 countries have met the UN target of 30 percent female decision-makers.
  • Around the world, only 22 percent of all national parliamentarians are female.
  • Two-thirds of all children denied school are girls, and 75 per cent of the world’s 876 million illiterate adults are women
  • In New Zealand, 20 percent of women will be physically abused by a male partner and one in five women will be a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime.
  • As a result of violence and neglect, there are 50 million fewer women in South Asia today than there should be.
  • In Fiji 41 percent of women who experienced violence reported being hit while pregnant.
  • In Samoa, 46 percent of women have been abused by their partner
  • When more women work, economies grow. An increase in female labour force participation—or a reduction in the gap between women’s and men’s labour force participation—results in faster economic growth
  • A study using data from 219 countries from 1970 to 2009 found that, for every one additional year of education for women of reproductive age, child mortality decreased by 9.5 per cent
  • Almost 300,000 women died in 2013 from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Most of these deaths are preventable. Of these deaths, 99 percent are in developing countries. In parts of Africa, maternal mortality rates are 1 in 16.
  • Women continue to participate in labour markets on an unequal basis with men. In 2013, the male employment-to-population ratio stood at 72.2 per cent, while the ratio for females was 47.1 per cent
  • Evidence from a range of countries shows that increasing the share of household income controlled by women, either through their own earnings or cash transfers, changes spending in ways that benefit children
  • It is calculated that women could increase their income globally by up to 76 per cent if the employment participation gap and the wage gap between women and men were closed. This is calculated to have a global value of USD 17 trillion
  • Increasing women and girls’ education contributes to higher economic growth. Increased educational attainment accounts for about 50 per cent of the economic growth in OECD countries over the past 50 years [3], of which over half is due to girls having had access to higher levels of education and achieving greater equality in the number of years spent in education between men and women [4]. But, for the majority of women, significant gains in education have not translated into better labour market outcomes
  • Gender differences in laws affect both developing and developed economies, and women in all regions. Almost 90 per cent of 143 economies studied have at least one legal difference restricting women’s economic opportunities [22]. Of those, 79 economies have laws that restrict the types of jobs that women can do
  • Women tend to have less access to formal financial institutions and saving mechanisms. While 55 per cent of men report having an account at a formal financial institution, only 47 per cent of women do worldwide. This gap is largest among lower middle-income economies as well as in South Asia and the Middle East and North Africa
  • Women are responsible for household food preparation in 85-90 per cent of cases surveyed in a wide range of countries
  • Gender inequalities in time use are still large and persistent in all countries. When paid and unpaid work are combined, women in developing countries work more than men, with less time for education, leisure, political participation and self-care [15]. Despite some improvements over the last 50 years, in virtually every country, men spend more time on leisure each day while women spend more time doing unpaid housework
  • From 1990-2000, 11 per cent of peace agreements (17 out of 664) included at least one reference to women. Out of the 504 agreements signed since the adoption of resolution 1325, only 138 (27 per cent) included references to women
  • Women and children bear the main negative impacts of fuel and water collection and transport, with women in many developing countries spending from 1 to 4 hours a day collecting biomass for fuel
  • Women bear disproportionate responsibility for unpaid care work. Women devote 1 to 3 hours more a day to housework than men; 2 to 10 times the amount of time a day to care (for children, elderly, and the sick), and 1 to 4 hours less a day to market activities [13]. In the European Union for example, 25 per cent of women report care and other family and personal responsibilities as the reason for not being in the labour force, versus only three per cent of men [14]. This directly and negatively impacts women’s participation in the labour force.
  • In conflict-affected countries, women’s share of seats in parliament is four percentage points below the global average of 22.7 per cent, and women occupy only 14.8 per cent of ministerial positions
  • Between 1992 and 2011, four per cent of signatories to peace agreements and less than 10 per cent of negotiators at peace tables were women
  • Women are more likely than men to work in informal employment [17]. In South Asia, over 80 per cent of women in non-agricultural jobs are in informal employment, in sub-Saharan Africa, 74 per cent, and in Latin America and the Caribbean, 54 per cent [18]. In rural areas, many women derive their livelihoods from small-scale farming, almost always informal and often unpaid
  • The percentage of UN field missions headed by women has fluctuated between 15 and 25 per cent since 2011
  • husbands can object to their wives working and prevent them from accepting jobs in 15 economies.
  • Women farmers control less land than do men, and also have limited access to inputs, seeds, credits, and extension services [28]. Less than 20 per cent of landholders are women [29]. Gender differences in access to land and credit affect the relative ability of female and male farmers and entrepreneurs to invest, operate to scale, and benefit from new economic opportunities
  • By 2016, in conflict and post-conflict countries with legislated electoral quotas, women make up 22 per cent of parliamentarians. However, in conflict and post-conflict countries without legislated electoral quotas, women make up only 11.2 per cent of parliamentarians
  • Women’s economic equality is good for business. Companies greatly benefit from increasing leadership opportunities for women, which is shown to increase organizational effectiveness. It is estimated that companies with three or more women in senior management functions score higher in all dimensions of organizational effectiveness
  • In the summer of 2014, six women ambassadors served on the UN Security Council, putting women’s representation at an unprecedented 40 per cent
  • Ethnicity and gender interact to create especially large pay gaps for minority women. In 2013 in the US for instance, “women of all major racial and ethnic groups earn less than men of the same group, and also earn less than white men
  • Approximately half of children of primary school age who are not in school live in conflict-affected areas. Girls, whose adjusted net enrolment rate in primary education is only 77.5 per cent in conflict and post-conflict countries, are particularly affected
  • Women comprise an average of 43 per cent of the agricultural labour force in developing countries, varying considerably across regions from 20 per cent or less in Latin America to 50 per cent or more in parts of Asia and Africa [27]. Despite the regional and sub-regional variation, women make an essential contribution to agriculture across the developing world.
  • Only 11.1 per cent of landholders in conflict and post-conflict countries are women, compared to 19 per cent globally
  • A study of time and water poverty in 25 sub-Saharan African countries estimated that women spend at least 16 million hours a day collecting drinking water; men spend 6 million hours; and children, 4 million hours
  • Women are 3 per cent of UN military peacekeepers
  • When women are included in peace processes there is a 20 per cent increase in the probability of an agreement lasting at least 2 years, and a 35 per cent increase in the probability of an agreement lasting at least 15 years
  • Twenty-seven countries have legal provisions that prevent mothers from conferring their nationality to children on an equal basis as fathers, which can lead to children being stateless
  • In peace processes between 1992 and 2011 women made up only:
  • - 2 per cent of Chief Mediators
  • - 4 per cent of Witnesses and Signatories
  • - 9 per cent of Negotiators
  • Forty per cent of convictions of individuals at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia include sexual violence charges
  • Only 13 per cent of stories in the news media on peace- and security-related themes included women as the subject, and women were central to the story in only six per cent of the cases. Only four per cent of the stories portrayed women as leaders in conflict and post-conflict countries, and only two per cent highlighted gender equality issues
  • In conflict and post-conflict countries, maternal mortality is on average 2.5 times higher [14]. More than half of the world’s maternal deaths occur in conflict-affected and fragile states, with the 10 worst-performing countries on maternal mortality all either conflict or post-conflict countries
  • In the recent Colombian peace negotiations, however, women participated as gender advisors and experts, negotiators, and in delegations of women affected by conflict, making up one-third of peace table participants and over 60 per cent of victims and experts [6].Negotiators from both sides met with delegations of women affected by conflict. The Colombia process had a gender subcommittee—the first of its kind—and the final agreement has a gender chapter, also the first of its kind, and gender is mainstreamed across all areas of the agreement
  • According to data collected between 2006 and 2010, female voters are four times as likely as men to be targeted for intimidation in elections in fragile and transitional states
  • Reports from the Democratic Republic of the Congo on the extent of conflict-related sexual violence range from 18 per cent to 40 per cent among women and girls and between four and 24 per cent among men and boys
  • Data from 40 countries shows a positive correlation between the proportion of female police and reporting rates of sexual assault
  • One in four households of all Syrian refugee families in Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq and Jordan are headed by women [23]. In Mali, more than 50 per cent of displaced families are headed by women
  • It is estimated that 35 per cent of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or sexual violence by a non-partner at some point in their lives. However, some national studies show that up to 70 per cent of women have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner in their lifetime
  • Before the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, the average age for marriage for a girl was between 20 and 25 years. In the refugee camps during and after the genocide, the average age for marriage was 15 years
  • Women who have been physically or sexually abused by their partners are more than twice as likely to have an abortion, almost twice as likely to experience depression, and in some regions, 1.5 times more likely to acquire HIV, as compared to women who have not experienced partner violence
  • In 2015 alone, the world spent an estimated US $34 billion on UN peacekeeping and humanitarian aid for victims of conflict and refugees. In the same year, experts also estimate that the total global cost of violence and conflict around the world was US $13.6 trillion. This is a cost of more than US $1,800 per person on the planet.
  • Forty-three per cent of women in the 28 European Union Member States have experienced some form of psychological violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime
  • Around 120 million girls worldwide (slightly more than 1 in 10) have experienced forced intercourse or other forced sexual acts at some point in their lives. By far the most common perpetrators of sexual violence against girls are current or former husbands, partners or boyfriends
  • It is estimated that of all women who were the victims of homicide globally in 2012, almost half were killed by intimate partners or family members, compared to less than six per cent of men killed in the same year
  • Adult women account for 51 per cent of all human trafficking victims detected globally. Women and girls together account for 71 per cent, with girls representing nearly three out of every four child trafficking victims. Nearly three out of every four trafficked women and girls are trafficked for the purpose of sexual exploitation
  • More than 1 in 4 women in Washington DC, United States, have experienced some form of sexual harassment on public transportation, according to a survey conducted in 2016
  • At least 200 million women and girls alive today have undergone female genital mutilation in the 30 countries with representative data on prevalence. In most of these countries, the majority of girls were cut before age 5.
  • Worldwide, almost 750 million women and girls alive today were married before their 18thbirthday. Child marriage is more common in West and Central Africa, where over 4 in 10 girls were married before age 18, and about 1 in 7 were married or in union before age 15. Child marriage often results in early pregnancy and social isolation, interrupts schooling, limits the girl’s opportunities and increases her risk of experiencing domestic violence
  • One in 10 women in the European Union report having experienced cyber-harassment since the age of 15 (including having received unwanted, offensive sexually explicit emails or SMS messages, or offensive, inappropriate advances on social networking sites). The risk is highest among young women between 18 and 29 years of age
  • Twenty-three per cent of female undergraduate university students reported having experienced sexual assault or sexual misconduct in a survey across 27 universities in the United States in 2015. Rates of reporting to campus officials, law enforcement or others ranged from 5 to 28 per cent, depending on the specific type of behavior
  • At least 140 countries have passed laws on domestic violence, and 144 have laws on sexual harassment. However, even when laws exist, this does not mean they are always compliant with international standards and recommendations or implemented. Still, 37 countries exempt rape perpetrators from prosecution when they are married to or subsequently marry the victim
  • Eighty-two per cent of women parliamentarians who participated in a study conducted by the Inter-parliamentary Union in 39 countries across 5 regions reported having experienced some form of psychological violence while serving their terms. Psychological violence was defined as remarks, gestures and images of a sexist or humiliating sexual nature made against them or threats and/or mobbing to which they might have been subjected. They cited social media as the main channel through which such psychological violence is perpetrated; nearly half of those surveyed (44 per cent) reported having received death, rape, assault or abduction threats towards them or their families
  • Evidence suggests that certain characteristics of women, such as sexual orientation, disability status or ethnicity, and some contextual factors, such as humanitarian crises, including conflict and post-conflict situations, may increase women’s vulnerability to violence
  • In 2014, 23 per cent of non-heterosexual women (those who identified their sexual orientation as lesbian, bisexual or other) interviewed in the European Union indicated having experienced physical and/or sexual violence by both male and female non-partner perpetrators, compared with five per cent of heterosexual women
  • Conflict affects women, girls, boys and men differently. Women and girls face heightened risks due to displacement and the breakdown of normal protection structures and support. They also face increased care-related tasks such as providing food and water, and caring for the sick
  • As of February 2017, 6.5 million Syrian people were displaced within the country [6] and more than 4.9 million people were living as refugees in neighbouring countries [7]. Approximately half of these refugees were women [8]. Agricultural trade and the informal economy are often the most impacted by crises. As women are over-represented in these industries, they are more likely to suffer economic losses. Further, women work longer hours than men, limiting their ability to participate in community decision-making meetings for humanitarian response
  • Approximately 35 per cent of women worldwide have experienced physical or sexual violence, and gender-based violence increases in conflict settings [3]. More than 70 per cent of women have experienced gender-based violence in some crisis settings
  • Less than 1 per cent of landholders in Yemen are women, although women make up 60 per cent of the labour force in crop farming
  • In a survey of 3,706 primary schoolchildren from Uganda, 24 per cent of 11 to 14-year-old girls with disabilities reported sexual violence at school, compared to 12 per cent of non-disabled girls
  • A recent report found that more than a third of Syrian refugee women between the ages of 20 and 24 had been married before the age of 18 [11]. Child marriage rates are four times higher in Syria now than before the crisis [12]. Although child marriage has long been prevalent in Yemen, rates have increased from 32 per cent [13] to 52 per cent in recent years, as dowries have plummeted and families use early marriage as a coping mechanism
  • During 2015, approximately 65 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of violence and persecution [4]. Further, an estimated 89 million people were affected by natural disasters
  • The life expectancy for Syrian women has declined from 75.9 to 55.7 years
  • Sixty percent of preventable maternal mortality deaths take place in settings of conflict, displacement and natural disasters [22]. Every day, 507 women and adolescent girls die from pregnancy and childbirth complications in emergency settings
  • There are approximately 781 million illiterate adults worldwide – two-thirds of whom are women
  • In conflict situations, there is a significant increase in female-headed households during and after conflict, and these are often the most impoverished. Some 39 per cent of Syrian households in Jordan are female-headed [18]. Income for female-headed households in Jordan can be up to one-third lower when compared to male-headed households
  • Since 1970, the number of people exposed to floods and tropical cyclones has doubled and women and children face an overwhelming burden during and after the crises
  • More than one-third (36 per cent) of children who are out of school globally live in war-affected countries. Adolescent girls in conflict zones are 90 per cent more likely to be out of school when compared to girls in other, conflict-free, countries [24]. Girls are often kept out of school due to concerns about safety
  • All forms of violence against women increase during disasters and displacement [16]. Both women and men in Syria have reported increased violence within the home, due to external stressors
  • Disasters such as droughts, floods and storms kill more women than men due to structural gender inequalities
  • In one province in Indonesia, more than 70 per cent of people who died in the 2004 Asian tsunami were women
  • Women and girls are disproportionately exposed to risk, increased loss of livelihoods, security, and even lives, during and in the aftermath of disasters. During monsoon season in Bangladesh, women and girls are disproportionately affected by flooding as many cannot swim or are unable to leave their homes due to cultural barriers
  • An estimated 87 per cent of unmarried women and 100 per cent of married women lost their main source of income when Cyclone Nargis hit the Ayeyarwaddy Delta in Myanmar in 2008
  • Hurricane Katrina, which struck New Orleans, USA in 2005, predominantly affected African American women—already the region’s poorest, most marginalized community
  • During droughts, girls are more likely to miss school as they are needed to collect water and care for family members [30]. Droughts and prolonged dry spells also lead to an increase in harmful practices against women such as domestic violence, child marriage, courtship rape and female genital mutilation [31]. Women and girls must travel longer distances to collect water, increasing their risk for sexual assault
  • After the 2015 earthquake in Nepal, UNFPA estimated that 2 million women and girls of reproductive age had been affected by the crisis, including approximately 126,000 pregnant women. With disruption to normal health services, the Population Fund estimated that 1,500 women per month would have difficulty accessing reproductive health services and consequently face life-threatening complications.
  • Studies have found that due to women’s roles as care-givers, during natural disasters they are more likely to make sacrifices, such as eating less food, for the well-being of their families. They are also more at risk for economic vulnerability, as men often migrate because of natural disasters. This can lead to divorce, desertion, and polygamy. Child marriage often increases to mitigate this economic vulnerability for young girls
  • Disaster damage and loss assessments are seldom disaggregated by sex and are usually recorded in terms of productive resources, which tend to be owned by men. This leads to a substantial undervaluation of the impact on women
  • To promote gender equality, humanitarian organizations need to strive for staff gender balance at all levels. However, recent research shows that men still constitute the large majority of humanitarian actors, and women often hold only symbolic positions
  • Only 22.8 per cent of all national parliamentarians were women as of June 2016, a slow increase from 11.3 per cent in 1995 [1]. At the current pace, it will take another 40 years to reach equal representation.
  • During natural disasters, the likelihood of rape, sexual exploitation and risky behaviour greatly increases the likelihood of unwanted pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections and complications regarding reproductive health
  • The likelihood of exclusion from education is most problematic among young women in sub-Saharan Africa, where 49.8 per cent of the female youth population had either no or limited education
  • Globally, youth entrepreneurship is still most common among older male youth, with self-employment being least likely among younger women
  • In the least developed countries, barely 60 per cent of girls complete primary school and just 30 per cent enroll in secondary school
  • A university educated young woman is almost two times more likely to complete the labour market transition than a less-educated young woman. It takes an average of 7.8 months for a young woman to attain her first job after completing education, whereas young men transition at an average of 6.9 months
  • An extra year of primary school for girls can increase their eventual adult wages by 10 to 20 per cent, and an extra year of secondary school increases wages by 15 to 25 per cent [9]. If all girls completed secondary education in low- and lower-middle income countries, under-five child mortality could be cut in half
  • An estimated 31 million girls of primary school age and 32 million girls of lower secondary school age were out of school in 2012 [3]. Girls are almost 2.5 times more likely to be out of school in conflict-affected countries than their counterparts in conflict-free countries
  • At least 200 million girls and women worldwide have undergone female genital mutilation. Data from 30 countries in 2015 indicate that more than 1 in 3 girls between 15 and 19 years of age have undergone the procedure
  • 1 in 5 women and girls aged 15-49, reported experiencing physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner within a 12-month period
  • Globally, young women aged 15–24 are most vulnerable to HIV, with infection rates twice as high as in young men, at 0.6 per cent [15]. Every minute, one young woman acquires HIV, accounting for 22 per cent of all new HIV infections, with sexual transmission being the dominant mode of infection.
  • 1.5 million people in the UK have an eating disorder – 90% of them women and girls
  • Globally, over 750 million women and girls alive today were married before their 18th birthday
  • An analysis of animated cartoons shows that female characters are far more likely to be portrayed as physically attractive than male characters and those who are attractive are far more likely to be portrayed as intelligent, employed, happy, loving and involved in kissing and hugging.
  • Of all women killed globally in 2012, it is estimated that almost half were killed by a partner or relative compared to less than 6% of men.
  • A European Union survey showed that 34% of women with a health problem or disability had experienced violence by a partner in their lifetime, compared to 19% per cent of women without a health problem or disability.
  • A survey conducted by Dove of 3000 women found that 90% of them wanted to change some aspect of their body with body weight and shape being the main concern.
  • The vast majority of women across the globe have experienced violence on the streets of their cities with 89% of women in Brazil, 86% in Thailand and 79% in India reporting harassment and abuse
  • Women spend at least twice as much time as men on domestic work, and when all work – paid and unpaid – is considered, women work longer hours than men.
  • Over 700 million women alive today were married when they were under 18, and of those some 250 million were married before they were 15.
  • In 2013, the global employment-to-population ratio was 72% for men and 47% for women.
  • Women bear disproportionate caring responsibility for children, the elderly and the sick, spending twice to ten times more time a day on unpaid care work than men.
  • In 2015, 90 per cent of police personnel and 97 per cent of military peacekeepers were men.
  • Only 11 out of 48 winners of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction have been women.
  • Businesses that create flexible work environments find that productivity goes up, they attract more talent, turnover is reduced and their bottom line improves.
  • At least 200 million girls and women worldwide have undergone female genital mutilation. Data from 30 countries in 2015 indicate that more than 1 in 3 girls between 15 and 19 years of age have undergone the procedure
  • Only 9 out of 52 winners of the National Book Award for Fiction are women.
  • If women played an identical role to men in the labour market, the results would be striking. The economic boost would be equivalent in size to the combined economies of the U.S. and China, for an additional annual global GDP of $28 trillion.
  • 94% of all the writing awards at the Oscars have gone to men.
  • Women undertake three-quarters of the world’s total unpaid care work. This includes caring for children and the elderly, cooking and cleaning.
  • Only four countries in the world fail to provide paid maternity leave to all workers: Lesotho, Swaziland, Papua, New Guinea and the United States
  • Single women make 90% of what men make. Women with children make 73% of what men make. Single women with children make 60% of what men make.
  • Women and children are 14x more likely than men to die during a disaster.
  • More than 70% of women have experienced gender- based violence in some crisis settings.
  • 60% of preventable maternal maternal mortality deaths take place in settings of conflict, displacement and natural disasters.
  • All forms of violence against women increase during disasters and displacement
  • Adolescent girls in conflict zones are 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than boys and 90% more likely to be out
  • of school compared to girls in other conflict-free countries.
  • 1 IN 5 REFUGEE OR DISPLACED WOMEN ARE ESTIMATED TO HAVE EXPERIENCED SEXUAL VIOLENCE
  • MORE THAN 70% OF THE CASUALTIES OF THE 2004 ASIAN TSUNAMI WERE WOMEN
  • DURING DROUGHTS, GIRLS ARE MORE LIKELY TO MISS SCHOOL AS THEY ARE NEEDED TO COLLECT WATER
  • AND CARE FOR FAMILY MEMBERS
  • Women make up just 23.5% of national parliaments, globally
  • 63% of the world’s illiterate population are women
  • Globally, women earn on average 60-75% of men’s wages
  • Up to 80% of men in the Asia- Paci c region admit to perpetra ng physical and/or sexual violence against women and
  • girls in their life me
  • 1 in 3 women worldwide will experience violence in their life me
  • Of all Fortune 500 companies, just 26 have a female CEO
  • Globally, the propor on of senior business roles held be women stands at 24%
  • Women reinvest 90% of their income back into the household
  • More than 1.3 billion women globally don’t have access to a nancial account at a formal ins tu on
  • Women spend, on average, three hours more per day than men on unpaid work in developing countries and two hours more
  • per day than men in developed countries; when all work—paid and unpaid—is considered, women work longer hours than men.
  • While women comprise roughly 47 per cent of all employees in Australia,[2] they take home on average $251.20 less than men each week (full-time adult ordinary earnings)
  • The national gender “pay gap” is 15.3 per cent and it has remained stuck between 15 per cent and 19 per cent for the past two decades.
  • Australian women account for 68% of primary carers for older people and people with disability
  • 95% of primary parental leave (outside of the public-sector) is taken by women
  • women spend almost three times as much time taking care of children each day, compared to men.
  • In 2017, Australia was ranked 35th on a global index measuring gender equality, slipping from a high point of 15th in 2006
  • Australian women are over-represented as part-time workers in low-paid industries and in insecure work and continue to be
  • underrepresented in leadership roles in the private and public sectors.
  • 35.6% of women experience physical or sexual intimate violence by partner, or non-partner, in their lifetime.
  • Every 10 minutes somewhere in the world, an adolescent girl dies as a result of violence.
  • 70% of the people in the world living in poverty are women
  • When women have more influence over economic decisions, their families allocate more income to food, health,
  • education, children’s clothing and children's nutrition
  • 90% of casualties in contemporary conflicts are civilians, the majority of whom are women and children
  • 2 in 3 women in the Pacific will experience physical and/or sexual violence at the hands of an intimate partner.
  • Less than 10% of negotiators at peace tables are women
  • In the Pacific, 16% of parliamentarians are women compared to the global average of 22.7%
  • Four of the five countries in the world, as of June 2016, that have no women in parliament are in The Pacific
  • 64% of the world’s illiterate adult population are women
  • More than half of women aged 18 or older have experienced sexual harassment in their lifetime
  • In 2015-2016 the average Australian woman was reaching retirement with an average of $113,660 less superannuation than the average male. [13] As a result, women are more likely to experience poverty in their retirement years and be far more reliant on the Age Pension.
  • On average, women spend 64 per cent of their working week performing unpaid care work.[11] They spend almost twice as many hours performing such work each week compared to men.
  • It is estimated that violence against women and their children cost the Australian economy $22 billion in 2015-16.
  • Australian men and women overwhelmingly believe (90 per cent) that men should be as involved in parenting as women.[19] However, while a significant number of fathers, and in particular young fathers, would like to be able to access better workplace flexibility arrangements, men are much more likely than women to have such requests denied.
  • The number of women on the Boards of ASX-listed companies grew from 8.3 per cent in 2009 to 26.2 per cent in 2017[17] due in part to a diversity policy implemented by the ASX Corporate Governance Council in 2010. Increasing the number of women in corporate leadership positions is likely to significantly increase financial returns.
  • As of 2016, over one million Australian workers are able to take leave and enjoy other protections because of domestic violence clauses in their workplace agreement or award conditions.
  • More than one in three Australian women has experienced physical or sexual violence in her lifetime and one in two experiences sexual harassment.
  • On average, Australian women have to work an extra 56 days a year to earn the same pay as men for doing the same work.
  • In 2016, just 57 percent world's working-age women are in the labor force, compared to 70 percent of working-age men.
  • Women with full-time jobs still earn only about 77 percent of their male counterparts' earnings. Talk about how much you earn, and report inequality.
  • African-American women earn 64 cents and Latina women earn 56 cents for every dollar earned by a Caucasian man.
  • 62 million girls are denied an education all over the world.
  • Every year, an estimated 15 million girls under 18 are married worldwide, with little or no say in the matter.
  • 4 out of 5 victims of human trafficking are girls.
  • According to the UN Foundation, "At least 250,000 maternal deaths and as many as 1.7 million newborn deaths would be averted if the need for both family planning and maternal and newborn health services were met."
  • On average, 30 percent of women who have been in a relationship report that they have experienced some form of physical or sexual violence by their partner.
  • Female genital mutilation (FGM) affects more than 200 million girls and women alive today in 30 countries. It is recognized internationally as a human rights violation.
  • American women serving in Iraq or Afghanistan are more likely to be raped by a comrade then killed by an enemy, and the rate of sexual harassment reports is higher than ever. In 2016, service members reported 6,172 cases of sexual assault compared to 6,082 in 2015.
  • In Saudi Arabia, women aren't allowed to drive and are discouraged from working jobs that would put them in contact with men. The unemployment rate for women is 33 percent for women, 7 percent for men.
  • At least 1000 honor killings occur in India and Pakistan each annually. Honor based crimes are distinguished by the fact that they are often carried out by a victim's family or community.
  • Women around the world aged 15-44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria.
  • Children and young people are hugely affected by violence against women. Exposure to violence against their mothers or other caregivers causes profound harm to children, with potential impacts on attitudes to relationships and violence, as well as behavioural, cognitive and emotional functioning, social development, and – through a process of ‘negative chain effects’ – education and later employment prospects.
  • 8 out of 10 victims of human trafficking are girls.
  • Women with full-time jobs still earn only about 77% of their male counterparts’ earnings.
  • On average, 30% of women who have been in a relationship report that they have experienced some form of intimate physical or sexual violence.
  • Every year, an estimate of 15 million girls less than 18 years are married off worldwide, with little or no say in the matter.
  • In Saudi Arabia, the unemployment rate for women is 34 percent for women, 7 percent for men.
  • 62 million girls are denied an education all over the world.
  • Only 30% of the world’s researchers are women.
  • Female genital mutilation (FGM) affects more than 200 million girls and women alive today in Africa, Asia and the Middle East where the vice is concentrated.
  • According to a report from the National Women’s Law Center, “The average full-time working woman will lose more than $460,000 over a 40-year period in wages due only to the wage gap. To catch up she will need to work 12 additional years.
  • Women around the world aged 15-44 are more at risk from rape and domestic violence than from cancer, car accidents, war and malaria.
  • There are approximately 781 million illiterates in the world. Two thirds whom are women.
  • A report by LeanIn.Org and McKinsey indicated that “Women are less likely to receive the first critical promotion to manager—so far fewer end up on the path to leadership—and they are less likely to be hired into more senior positions… Corporate America promotes men at 30 percent higher rates than women during early career stages
  • 60% of the world's chronically hungry are women and girls.
  • Only 46 countries have met the UN target of 30 percent female decision-makers.
  • Around the world, only 22 percent of all national parliamentarians are female.
  • Two-thirds of all children denied school are girls, and 75 per cent of the world’s 876 million illiterate adults are women
  • In New Zealand, 20 percent of women will be physically abused by a male partner and one in five women will be a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime.
  • As a result of violence and neglect, there are 50 million fewer women in South Asia today than there should be.
  • In Fiji 41 percent of women who experienced violence reported being hit while pregnant.
  • In Samoa, 46 percent of women have been abused by their partner
  • When more women work, economies grow. An increase in female labour force participation—or a reduction in the gap between women’s and men’s labour force participation—results in faster economic growth
  • A study using data from 219 countries from 1970 to 2009 found that, for every one additional year of education for women of reproductive age, child mortality decreased by 9.5 per cent
  • Almost 300,000 women died in 2013 from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Most of these deaths are preventable. Of these deaths, 99 percent are in developing countries. In parts of Africa, maternal mortality rates are 1 in 16.
  • Women continue to participate in labour markets on an unequal basis with men. In 2013, the male employment-to-population ratio stood at 72.2 per cent, while the ratio for females was 47.1 per cent
  • Evidence from a range of countries shows that increasing the share of household income controlled by women, either through their own earnings or cash transfers, changes spending in ways that benefit children
  • It is calculated that women could increase their income globally by up to 76 per cent if the employment participation gap and the wage gap between women and men were closed. This is calculated to have a global value of USD 17 trillion
  • Increasing women and girls’ education contributes to higher economic growth. Increased educational attainment accounts for about 50 per cent of the economic growth in OECD countries over the past 50 years [3], of which over half is due to girls having had access to higher levels of education and achieving greater equality in the number of years spent in education between men and women [4]. But, for the majority of women, significant gains in education have not translated into better labour market outcomes
  • Gender differences in laws affect both developing and developed economies, and women in all regions. Almost 90 per cent of 143 economies studied have at least one legal difference restricting women’s economic opportunities [22]. Of those, 79 economies have laws that restrict the types of jobs that women can do
  • Women tend to have less access to formal financial institutions and saving mechanisms. While 55 per cent of men report having an account at a formal financial institution, only 47 per cent of women do worldwide. This gap is largest among lower middle-income economies as well as in South Asia and the Middle East and North Africa
  • Women are responsible for household food preparation in 85-90 per cent of cases surveyed in a wide range of countries
  • Gender inequalities in time use are still large and persistent in all countries. When paid and unpaid work are combined, women in developing countries work more than men, with less time for education, leisure, political participation and self-care [15]. Despite some improvements over the last 50 years, in virtually every country, men spend more time on leisure each day while women spend more time doing unpaid housework
  • From 1990-2000, 11 per cent of peace agreements (17 out of 664) included at least one reference to women. Out of the 504 agreements signed since the adoption of resolution 1325, only 138 (27 per cent) included references to women
  • Women and children bear the main negative impacts of fuel and water collection and transport, with women in many developing countries spending from 1 to 4 hours a day collecting biomass for fuel
  • Women bear disproportionate responsibility for unpaid care work. Women devote 1 to 3 hours more a day to housework than men; 2 to 10 times the amount of time a day to care (for children, elderly, and the sick), and 1 to 4 hours less a day to market activities [13]. In the European Union for example, 25 per cent of women report care and other family and personal responsibilities as the reason for not being in the labour force, versus only three per cent of men [14]. This directly and negatively impacts women’s participation in the labour force.
  • In conflict-affected countries, women’s share of seats in parliament is four percentage points below the global average of 22.7 per cent, and women occupy only 14.8 per cent of ministerial positions
  • Between 1992 and 2011, four per cent of signatories to peace agreements and less than 10 per cent of negotiators at peace tables were women
  • Women are more likely than men to work in informal employment [17]. In South Asia, over 80 per cent of women in non-agricultural jobs are in informal employment, in sub-Saharan Africa, 74 per cent, and in Latin America and the Caribbean, 54 per cent [18]. In rural areas, many women derive their livelihoods from small-scale farming, almost always informal and often unpaid
  • The percentage of UN field missions headed by women has fluctuated between 15 and 25 per cent since 2011
  • husbands can object to their wives working and prevent them from accepting jobs in 15 economies.
  • Women farmers control less land than do men, and also have limited access to inputs, seeds, credits, and extension services [28]. Less than 20 per cent of landholders are women [29]. Gender differences in access to land and credit affect the relative ability of female and male farmers and entrepreneurs to invest, operate to scale, and benefit from new economic opportunities
  • By 2016, in conflict and post-conflict countries with legislated electoral quotas, women make up 22 per cent of parliamentarians. However, in conflict and post-conflict countries without legislated electoral quotas, women make up only 11.2 per cent of parliamentarians
  • Women’s economic equality is good for business. Companies greatly benefit from increasing leadership opportunities for women, which is shown to increase organizational effectiveness. It is estimated that companies with three or more women in senior management functions score higher in all dimensions of organizational effectiveness
  • In the summer of 2014, six women ambassadors served on the UN Security Council, putting women’s representation at an unprecedented 40 per cent
  • Ethnicity and gender interact to create especially large pay gaps for minority women. In 2013 in the US for instance, “women of all major racial and ethnic groups earn less than men of the same group, and also earn less than white men
  • Two-thirds of all children denied school are girls, and 75 per cent of the world’s 876 million illiterate adults are women
  • In New Zealand, 20 percent of women will be physically abused by a male partner and one in five women will be a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime.
  • As a result of violence and neglect, there are 50 million fewer women in South Asia today than there should be.
  • In Fiji 41 percent of women who experienced violence reported being hit while pregnant.
  • In Samoa, 46 percent of women have been abused by their partner
  • When more women work, economies grow. An increase in female labour force participation—or a reduction in the gap between women’s and men’s labour force participation—results in faster economic growth
  • A study using data from 219 countries from 1970 to 2009 found that, for every one additional year of education for women of reproductive age, child mortality decreased by 9.5 per cent
  • Almost 300,000 women died in 2013 from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. Most of these deaths are preventable. Of these deaths, 99 percent are in developing countries. In parts of Africa, maternal mortality rates are 1 in 16.

I am doing this in support of UN Women National Committee (NC) Australia.  A global champion for women and girls, UN Women is the United Nations entity responsible for promoting women’s empowerment and gender equality and was established to accelerate progress to meet the needs of women and girls worldwide.

UN Women NC Australia exists to raise funds for and awareness of UN Women’s work in the Pacific and around the world.

UN Women’s priority areas include:

  • Expanding women’s leadership and participation
  • Ending violence against women by enabling states to set up the mechanisms needed to formulate and enforce appropriate laws and services;
  • Enhancing women’s economic empowerment
  • Strengthening the implementation of the Women, Peace And Security agenda
  • Making gender equality priorities central to national, local and sectoral planning and budgeting.